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How to Make Resin Bracelets with Flowers

2 resin bracelets with flowers lying on a fluffy blanket

I have really enjoyed learning how to use resin in a variety of different craft projects recently. In one of the kits that I ordered for another project, was this simple silicone bracelet mold that has so much possibility. I used dried flowers in my bracelets, however there are so many other bits and bobs you could use.

I did have some ups and downs while making these bracelets, but I will let you in on it all, including the mistakes I made along the way. I still have a lot to learn, so join me for the fun while we make some more awesome resin jewelry.

Making a Resin Bracelets with Flowers using UV Resin

I have to say this. I love UV Resin! Making jewelry with UV resin is so fast and instantly gratifying. Unlike 2 part epoxy, where you have to wait for what seems like a lifetime for it to cure, UV resin cures in minutes under a UV lamp, allowing you to have finished projects in no time at all. And, there are so many small things (not just flowers!) that could be added to this project to give you endless style combinations. Here is how I made the UV resin bracelet with flowers pictured above.

Materials:

Instructions:

  1. Prep your work area with a non stick silicone mat, or protective covering and lay out your materials.
  2. I cannot stress this enough… Put on your gloves! I have forgotten before, and resin is not skin friendly.
  3. Make sure your bracelet mold is clean and dust free (You can spray it out with canned air!).
  1. Squeeze enough UV resin into the mold to cover the inside bottom of the mold and give the flowers a base it stand up in.
  2. Using the tweezers, start adding dried flowers to the mold.
  3. Once your flowers are added, fill the mold to the top with resin.
  1. Tap the mold on your work surface to help the larger bubbles to rise to the top. Make sure to push down with your tweezers any flowers that have started to float .
  2. Using your BBQ grill lighter, lightly wave it over the surface of the resin in the mold. This should pop any surface bubbles. Any bubbles that do not pop, try to pop them with the tip of your tweezers.
  3. Cure your bracelet under your UV lamp according to the package directions. If your lamp is larger than your mold, be sure to move the lamp around over different areas of the bracelet while curing to insure the light hits all of the resin.
  4. Once your bracelet it cured, de-mold it. It is also a good idea to place the bracelet back under the lamp for a couple of minutes after removing it from the mold.

Some Mistakes I Made With the UV Resin

Not every project turns out perfect. It always seems that when I make a craft, there is a flaw I wish I could tell people (or myself) to avoid the next time. With this project, I wish I had checked better under the rim of the mold for large bubbles. Though I think some bubbles add character, really large bubbles at the edge of a project can leave a hole (you can fill these in!), or worse, a bubble just under the surface that you cannot do anything about. So be sure to run your tweezers under the edge of the mold rim to release these bubbles to be popped.

The other thing I wish I had done was to go back and top off the mold with more resin before fully curing it and removing it from the mold. One edge of my bracelet has a slightly dented in look as if the resin shrunk a bit. It still looks beautiful, just something I will want to watch out for in the future.

Making a Resin Bracelets with Flowers using 2 Part Epoxy Resin

2 part epoxy resin has been a bit harder for me to use. Though it is cheaper to buy, I just can’t seem to get it right. Though I do love that 2 part resin is a bit easier to pour (UV resin is just a bit thicker) when it is mixed, and how solid and strong my pieces come out after curing, your work station needs to be at the right temperature, and it can take a day or longer to cure. My hope is that the more I work with it, the easier it will become for me to work with. Here is how I made my 2 part epoxy bracelet with flowers, and some of the problems I encountered.

Materials:

Instructions:

  1. Prep your work area with a non stick silicone mat, or protective covering and lay out your materials.
  2. I cannot stress this enough… Put on your gloves! I have forgotten before, and resin is not skin friendly.
  3. Make sure your bracelet mold is clean and dust free (You can spray it out with canned air!).
  4. If your part A and part B resin bottles are not at least at room temperature, place them in a warm water bath to bring them up to temperature.
  1. Measure and mix your 2 part resin according to your resin’s package directions for the size of your mold. Make sure to set your timer so that you mix it long enough.
  2. Once mixed thoroughly, pour enough resin into the mold to cover the bottom and give your flowers a base.
  3. Using tweezers, start placing your flowers into the mold.
  4. Once you have all of your flowers where you want them, top off the mold with more resin.
  1. Lightly tap your mold on your work surface to help the bubbles rise to the top of the mold. If any of your flowers have risen out of the resin, use your tweezers to push them back down.
  2. Using your lighter, wave the flame back and forth over the top to the mold to pop any surface bubbles. Don’t hold the lighter in one place as this could burn your resin and your mold.
  3. Place your project in a warm dry place to cure according to your resin’s instruction.
  4. Once cured, unmold and enjoy.

Some Mistakes I Made With the 2 Part Epoxy

I think I knew from the beginning of this 2 part epoxy bracelet, that it was not going to turn out how I wanted it to. My final project is riddled with tiny bubbles all throughout the resin. It gives the bracelet a foggy, almost snow globe look instead of the crystal clear it should be.

When investigating why this happened, one of the suggestions was that I needed to warm my resin in a water bath. To do this, you just take your part A and B bottles and place them in a bowl filled with warm water to bring them up to room temperature. Do make sure that your caps are on tight and you dry the bottles really well before using them, as water will destroy your resin if it gets in.

Another suggestion was that the room I was working in and storing my projects to cure was too cold (below 74 degrees). And to this I agree. I live in the south, and we always have our air conditioner running (We don’t like to sweat). It should be easy enough to find a warmer workspace the next time I pour resin, but I am still unsure of an area for curing where I could control the temperature separate from changing the temperature in my house. One solution I read about for curing was a “warm box”. From what I can tell, it is a type of box with a heating pad in the bottom and your project cures on top of the heating pad. For this, I will be doing more research.

All in all, I am happy with how things turned out. Not only the bracelets, but the knowledge I gained when things didn’t go quite right.

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